Category Archives: Optics

Environmentally Friendly LED Lighting Components

Generally, we can say that LEDs are environmentally friendly and recyclable. They have a long lifetime and low power consumption. They don’t contain hazardous substances, for example, mercury as compact fluorescent lamps do. In this blog post, I will present to you four environmentally friendly luminaire component choices.

LED That Don’t Need a Driver

Have you ever looked inside the driver? In the picture above, you can see the inside of the small-sized one. Drivers are made of many different materials and components. That’s why they are hard to recycle. The fewer components product has, the easier it is to recycle. For example, an aluminium heatsink is easy to recycle, because it contains mainly aluminium.

Drivers are the most fragile parts of the luminaire. In general, they can be the first component that breaks from the luminaire.

All traditional LEDs needs a driver to work. Except for AC COB that can be connected straight to the mains power. Because AC COB doesn’t need a driver, luminaire can be a lot smaller than before. This gives more flexibility for the design. At the same time, you can save in logistics and packing. You can read more about AC COB from our blog post.

Same Lumen Output with a Smaller Luminaire

Size is an important feature when designing environmentally friendly luminaires. When you use less material the luminaire gets smaller. And by downsizing the luminaire you can save in logistics and packing.

One great way to make the luminaire smaller is Citizen’s HC COB. It has higher efficacy and lower terminal resistance. This means that you can use a smaller heatsink. Therefor luminaire gets smaller the and you can still get the same lumen output. As a result, it makes HC COB more environmental choice. Read more about HC COB from here.

The Right Amount of Light and Less Light Pollution with Right Optics

When we talk about LEDs, often we come up with light pollution. We can say that almost all outdoor light that doesn’t have a purpose is light pollution. This means that light always needs a target.

When you replace the old light sources (for example HPS-lamps) with same powered LED, you get a lot more light. This is not environmentally friendly. You get a lot of unnecessary light and same time create light pollution.

When we design luminaires with the same lumen output than before, LED saves energy. This is because LED has less than 10% of the incandescent lamp’s power consumption. That’s why it is important to think about lumens, not power when replacing lamps with LEDs.

LEDs light comes from a very small area and from a flat surface, so it is easier to control than a light bulb. In street lights, most of the light pollution comes from light that goes up and away from the road. It is important to choose optics for the luminaire which are designed to minimize the light pollution.

Control the Luminaires with Sensors

There’s a lot of different sensors for different applications. The most familiar ones are the on/off-sensors. They automatically switch the light >on and off  by movement. They save energy, as the light can never be accidentally left on. This type of sensors is already generally used in public spaces.

Another great way to save energy is to use daylight sensors. They react to the light that comes from the outside. This way you can maximize the benefits of the sunlight. For example, during the day, you don’t need as much artificial light as in the evening. Read more about sensors from this blog post.

We have already made big steps in ecology, but still, we have a lot to do. We need to think about the packing of the luminaire and logistics. It’s important to minimize the amount of plastic used in packing. Also, we need to think alternatives for air freight. Small choices really matter.

Below you can download a presentation about Citizen’s AC COB. If you have anything to ask, you can always email to me: taru.matikainen@light.fi

Download Here

Glass Lens vs. Silicone Lens in Street Light

What is the difference between a lens made from optical glass and the lens made from silicon, when used in street light application?

In this blog post, I will explain the pros and cons of both lenses. I will also use a case example to showcase the differences.

The Basics

First let me explain few basic terms related to optics in street light:

Light Pollution

Light that doesn’t go to desired direction and causes harm of anykind. It is wasted light, that isn’t used to its primary purpose. Light pollution can be divided to three different categories:

  • Glare

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Discomfort glare results in an instinctive desire to look away from a bright light source or difficulty in seeing a task. So as told by its name, discomfort glare causes discomfort.

  • Uplight
Light Pollution (Uplight/Skyglow)

Light Pollution (Uplight/Skyglow)

Uplight can be seen especially in cities: it makes sky glow and stars disappear.

  • Light tresspass
Light Pollution (Light trespass)

Light Pollution (Light trespass)

Light trespass is found in the vicinity of streets: it can prevent you from sleeping or disturb your garden lighting.

Optical glass

Pros:

  • Cheap to manufacture
  • Very high temperature range, sensitive also to stress

Cons:

    • Complex optical shapes can’t be done accurately or if the complex shapes are needed, it is expensive
    • Non-optimal light distribution in street light
    • Heavier than silicone (freight costs are more expensive)
    • Lower light transmission than in silicone lenses

 

Silicone

Pros:

  • Enables high precision manufacturing of complex optical shapes
  • High integration level in luminaire
  • Material weighs less than in case of glass lens

Cons:

  • Cost is higher than for glass lens

  • Lower temperature range
  • Lower fire rating

Glass Lens

Glass Lens Light Distribution in Street Light Application

Glass Lens Light Distribution in Street Light Application

In the image you can see the light distribution image taken from above. This application uses Glass lens.

      • Boom angle 15 deg
      • 10880 LED lm, eff 88%
      • Eav 9.0 lx (>9.0 lx)
      • Eav/Emin 2.2 (<4.0)
      • Lv max/Lav 0.3 (<0.4)

Silicone Lens

Silicone Lens (Stella DWC2) Light Distribution in Street Light Application

Silicone Lens (Stella DWC2) Light Distribution in Street Light Application

In the image you can see the light distribution image taken from above. This application uses Stella DWC2 Silicone lens.

      • Boom angle 10 deg
      • 8400 LED lm, eff 92%
      • Eav 9.0 lx (>9.0 lx)
      • Eav/Emin 2.3 (<4.0)
      • Lv max/Lav 0.3 (<0.4)

Results

Glass lens needs more lumens for the same application. In this case, around 20% more. This means that you generally speaking need more power to get the same amount of light out from the luminaire.

The reason behind the lumen need is the fact that glass lens generates more light pollution. You can see that the trespass light area is much larger in glass lens image (the red box). And on top of this, glass lens distributes light 10 meters away from road. In comparison, silicone lens only distributes 7 meters.

So I think I can end this blog post by stating that the silicone lens gives a lot of advantages over glass lens in street light application.